A bi-weekly roundup of international social science in Chicago |
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 

CISSR SPOTLIGHT

 
 
 

Announcing the 2018-2019 CISSR Faculty Fellows

 
 

CISSR proudly welcomes the newest members of our scholarly community. New awards to faculty in Anthropology, Sociology, Political Science, and the Harris School of Public Policy facilitate innovative social science research in more than a dozen countries. 

 
 
 
Learn about next year's projects
 
 
 
 

Cities of Delhi: Differentiated Citizenship in the Capital City

Brown University sociologist Patrick Heller discusses his fieldwork on unequal access to basic public services in Delhi, India.

 
 
 
Details & RSVP
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
   
 
 
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

 
 
 
 

THIS WEEK

 
 
 

THURSDAY February 8

 
 
 

Talismans to Pacify the Tomb: Archaeological Evidence from Central China and Dunhuang

Christine Mollier (French National Center for Scientific Research)

 
 
 

Enchanted Geography: India in the West African Popular Imagination

David Amponsah (University of Missouri)

 
 
 

FRIDAY February 9

 
 
 

Socialist Appetizers, Plov, and the Teardrop of a Nightingale: Imagining Uzbek Food in New York City

Sebile Yapici (Goethe University Frankfurt)

 
 
 

MONDAY February 12

 
 
 

Urban Art and the Block: Places – Making, Unmaking, and Unmasking

 
 
 

Popular Music At Home: The Sound Postcard in the People's Republic of Poland

Andrea Bohlman (UNC-Chapel Hill)

 
 
 

Coffee in the Anthropocene: Socio-Ecological Aspects of Coffee in the Soconusco Region of Chiapas

Ivette Perfecto (University of Michigan)

 
 
 
 

NEXT WEEK

 
 
 

TUESDAY February 13

 
 
 

Stabilizing an Unstable World: Practical Lessons from Frontline Peacebuilding

Shamil Idriss (Search for Common Ground)

 
 
 

WEDNESDAY February 14

 
 
 

Favoritism: The Political Economy of Social Networks

Quoc-Anh Do (Sciences Po)

 
 
 

THURSDAY February 15

 
 
 

Libya, Modern Slavery, and the Global Migration Crisis

Panel Discussion

6pm  •  International House, Assembly Hall

 
 
 

FRI/SAT February 16-17

 
 
 

Wang Bing's Crude Oil

Two-part film screening and discussion

 
 
 

MONDAY February 19

 
 
 

The Paradox of the Popular in Brazilian Cinema

Fernao Pessoa Ramos (UNICAMP)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SAVE THE DATE

The Politics of Race in Global Perspective: A Symposium in Honor of Mark Q. Sawyer

This conference will reflect on the state of the comparative study of race and new directions inspired by political scientist Mark Q. Sawyer (PhD’99, 1972-2017). Learn more & RSVP »

 
 
 
 
 

AROUND TOWN & DOWN THE ROAD

 
 
 
 

FEBRUARY 7

 
 
 

Austin Wright (UChicago), Derran Moss-Dalmau (United Nations), Michelle Breslauer (Institute for Economics and Peace)

 
 
 

"Take him and tell him to be circumcised": Moral Order and Respectability in Early Postcolonial Uganda

Pamela Khanakwa, Makerere University (Uganda)

 
 
 

The State of Global Democracy

Michael Abramowitz, Freedom House

 
 
 

FEBRUARY 13

 
 
 

Panel Discussion

5:30pm  •  CCGA Conference Center

 
 
 

Embodying Diaspora: A Monthly Dance Workshop

 
 
 
 

FEBRUARY 17

 
 
 

Big Shoulders International Student Film Festival

 
 
 

SAVE THE DATE

 
 
 

FEBRUARY 22

 
 
 

US Army Photographers and the ‘Seen Side’ and ‘Blind Side’ of the Japanese Military ‘Comfort Women’

Sung Hyun Kang (SungKongHoe University)

5pm  •  Harris School, Room 319

 
 
 

MARCH 7

 
 
 

Bruce Cumings (UChicago)

 
 
 

MARCH 8

 
 
 

Public Roundtable

 
 
 

To suggest an item for a future digest, please send details via this submission form.

 
 
 
 

NEWS & RESEARCH ROUNDUP

 
 
   
 

U.S. foreign policy in the Trump era and beyond

In this extended interview, political scientist John Mearhsheimer discusses Trump's foreign agenda one year into his administration, main challenges facing America internationally, and the potential for change in U.S. foreign policy.

 
   
 

It’s 2 Minutes to Midnight

Citing growing nuclear risks and unchecked climate dangers, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (headquartered at UChicago) set its symbolic Doomsday Clock at its closest point to midnight since the beginning of the Cold War. The Clock has become a universally recognized indicator of the world’s vulnerability to catastrophe from nuclear weapons, other emerging technologies, and climate changes.

 
 

Robert McCormick Adams, anthropologist, former provost and Oriental Institute director, 1926-2018

Colleagues remember the prolific scholar as one of the most influential figures in the archaeology of ancient complex societies, who fundamentally transformed theories about the origins of urbanism before leaving to shape museums in the nation’s capital. 

 
 
 

Up close and personal: Prof. Zonis gets into Shah's mindset, analyzes reasons for his downfall

Interviewed by the Iranian news agency Mehr, Professor Emeritus Marvin Zonis describes the political and personal factors that led to the Pahlavi regime's collapse in 1979.

 
 
   
 

Authoritarianism and the Elite Origins of Democracy

A new book coauthored by CISSR Faculty Fellow Michael Albertus uses data spanning two centuries to examine the influence of authoritarian elites on  democratic transitions. Detailing methods used by elites to shield themselves and secure influence during democratization, the book also looks at examples of democracies that emerged with more egalitarian social contracts.

 
   
 
 
 

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

 
 
 
 

A Safer or a More Dangerous World? Nuclear Weapons in Today’s Global Community

On January 29, a panel of University of Chicago international relations scholars convened for a public discussion of foreign policy and the threats posed by nuclear weapons throughout the world. Moderated by WBEZ’s Steve Edwards, the event was organized by CISSR Advisory Board member Paul Poast and included political science professors Robert Pape, Paul Staniland, Austin Carson, and CPOST's nuclear proliferation fellow, Paige Price Cone.