Hurley Elder Care Law Newsletter - October 2016
In this month's newsletter, learn all about Alzheimer's disease.
 
 
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The Saver Generation              October 2016

Why do seniors have so much stuff? 

We all have too many things that enhance and complicate our lives. How much “clutter” a person has is often based on their birth date. Let me explain! To those who lived through the depression, possessions have been of great importance because they knew early on, that the replacement of something was probably not possible. Hanging onto things became a way of life and this is why elderly people are still saving bread bags and jars, boxes and torn bedsheets that can still be mended, and socks with holes in them to be fixed and recycled. Their clutter consists of possessions they don’t really need and becomes clutter especially when there is not a good place for it to be stored. These things are just excess and most likely not necessary to keep; they are just there.

Another type of clutter consists of very prized possessions. You might call this a predicament of possessions that becomes an emotional roller coaster. An onlooker might not realize the attachment a person has to possessions; these things are actually very dear to a person – there just is not enough room to store them. As people age, getting rid of things that have accumulated over decades of living is a great undertaking, at best it is a very emotional task. How can you rate the attachment one has to certain possessions when they all seem to have stories attached to them? Possessions are part of a person’s history and their legacy. For instance, “I received this sweater as a gift from my son.” “I created this scrapbook throughout my school days.”  “I worked a second job to afford this table.” “I want to pass this down to my daughter.” And on and on…. Unfortunately, many items the seniors are saving for their children are unwanted; society has changed. 

Trouble Downsizing?

The probability of people divesting themselves of their belongings decreases each decade after age 50, according to David J. Ekerdt, a professor of sociology and gerontology at the University of Kansas. So where and how does an 80-year-old begin to downsize? Not many people do what my own mother did. After the death of my father and definitely in the throes of grieving, she called an estate sale company which promptly sold her on turning over her entire household as she was preparing to move into a small independent living complex. Gone were the treasures, the pictures, the special books and pieces of furniture that held special memories not only for her but for her children and grandchildren. There were no mementoes left to share. 

So how can you reach a happy middle ground when it comes time to downsize? In today’s society the task of whittling down what you have and what you are able to keep is often left to adult children. They have to deal with excess furniture and possessions when a parent has to change residence and go into an assisted living or a nursing home. They are also the beneficiaries of all their parents’ belongings after a death. If not able to accomplish this huge task of divesting possessions alone, hiring someone you can trust becomes critical; the decisions you make are very emotional. In any case, determine what you should keep, recycle, donate, or sell. Running an estate sale, selling on eBay, or finding an agency that is thrilled to have excess clothing or furniture are but a few ideas to remove some items. Taking pictures of prized possessions can stave off some of the emotional stress for you and/or the downsizing parent.

Take your time and realize you can manage this. After all, the accumulation took a long time, perhaps a lifetime to create; you can’t undo it overnight. You won’t lose the memories – enjoy them.

Family Business This month was a busy travel time for the Hurley/Morris family. Louise and Joannas Uncle John and Auntie Fran had their 50th wedding anniversary party in England! Miles, Louise, Joanna and their father all traveled across the pond to join in on the celebration! All had a splendid time. Cheers to John and Fran!
Upcoming Events! 
November 3, 2016 - Complimentary Dinner and Discussion on VA Benefits at Brookdale Historic Roswell 

Join Danielle Humphrey, JD, CELA, as she discusses the "Hidden Secrets of Veterans Benefits that the VA Won’t Tell You About." The Aid and Attendance benefit is one of the VA’s best-kept secrets from our retired service men and women. Veterans over the age of 65, who are disabled, can be eligible for as much as $2,120 per month in addition to any other VA pension or service-related benefit they may receive. Surviving spouses can qualify for up to $1,149 per month. Learn more about this hidden benefit and other non-service related benefits. Location: Brookdale Historic Roswell, 75 Magnolia Street, Roswell, GA 30075. Date and Time: Thursday, November 3, 2016, Dinner at 5:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.; Presentation at 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Please RSVP to Stacy Stafford at sstafford@brookdale.com or 770-645-1900.

November 3, 2016 - Learn About Veterans Benefits in West Cobb at Sterling Estates 

Please join Hurley Elder Care Law as we discuss "The Hidden Secrets of Veterans Benefits that the VA Won't Tell You.” The Aid and Attendance benefit is one of the VA’s best-kept secrets from our retired service men and women. Veterans over the age of 65, who are disabled, can be eligible for as much as $2,120 per month in addition to any other VA pension or service related benefit they may receive. Surviving spouses can qualify for up to $1,149 per month. Learn more about this “hidden benefit” and other non-service related benefits. The discussion, free and open to the public, will take place at Sterling Estates of West Cobb, 3165 Dallas Hwy., Marietta, GA 30064 on Thursday, November 3, 2016 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Please RSVP at 770-255-7000 or smeyer@sterling-estates.com.

Recent Blogs Charitable Elders- Learn why older people are more charitable.

Flu Vaccines Available- Learn where you can get your annual flu shot

Human Life Has Its Limits- Just how long can a human live?

Tax Credit for Caregivers- This proposed bill would provide federal tax credits to working caregivers.

Elder Care Resources
Bank Accounts Drained by DementiaDid you know that dementia is the most expensive disease?

Dispute After Death- Planning ahead can prevent disputes among family members over your belongings.

Advance Directive Myths- How many of these myths did you believe?


Miles P. Hurley, JD, CELA  Miles P. Hurley founded Hurley Elder Care Law in 2006 to provide legal assistance to the elderly population on issues relating to aging including retaining independence, quality of life and financial security. Mr. Hurley is one of ten attorneys in the state of Georgia to receive the Elder Law Attorney Certification, and one of approximately 400 nationwide. 
Hurley Elder Care Law is dedicated to the process of long-term care and estate planning. Call us today for a free phone consultation with a client coordinator at (404) 843-0121.
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Hurley Elder Care Law
100 Galleria Pkwy, Suite 650
Atlanta, GA 30339
404-843-0121

Satellite Offices
2011 Commerce Dr. Suite 100, Peachtree City, GA 30269   
225 Creekstone Ridge, Woodstock, GA 30188       
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Hurley Elder Care Law       404-843-0121

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